Category Archives: Theatre

Bollywood,Reality TV and Indian secularism

Bradistan Calling

Indian TV has seen numerous Bollywood reality shows, competition where common boys (and occasionally girls) have won places on movies by top directors. The Show that I want to talk about is Bollywood, blind-date and arranged (and staged) marriage all rolled into one big media circus. Continue reading

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Obituary:Kashmir Broadcasting Corporation

Stop Press:

Kashmir Broadcasting Corporation suddenly suspended  its satellite transmissions globally after one year of success broadcasting.This incident is most unfortunate and shows a lack of financial backing for independent TV in a climate of global recession.There was no official confirmation of this interruption. Continue reading

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VIVA LA BRADISTAN MELA

THIS IS BRADISTAN

(courtesy Daily Times – this article was first published.Sir Cam was the Guest columnist for Bradistan from Mela 2003.Dil Nawaz’s comments and updates for2008 will appear within brackets 2009 Mela will be held on weekend of 13th and 14th of June 2009)

Here in was a mighty fusion of cultures: Eastern, Western, English, Pakistani, Indian, African, Arab and others — a potpourri of sounds, smells, and sights Continue reading

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Ajoka’s Musafat theatre festival (Lahore and Karachi)

Say No to Talibanization Cultural activity is under threat in Pakistan

Please attend Ajoka’s performances:

1. Hotel Mohenjodaro on 17th May

2. Dekh Tamasha Chalta Ban 18th May

3. Burqavaganza 23rd May

4. Bulha 24th May Venue: 8:00p.m, at Alhamra Hall # 2, The Mall, Lahore.

Entry is Free

In Karachi, the festival will be held at the Arts Council from 30th May to 4th June 2009

For further information 042-6682443/ 6686634

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“Perhaps it’s time for yet another performance of Border Border in both countries”

THE HINDU notes: In 25 years, the noted Pakistani theatre personality’s group, Ajoka, has engaged with issues ranging from the ‘military-mullah nexus’ and brutalisation of society, to the construction of post-Partition identities. Following Ajoka’s recent performances in India in stormy times, Madeeha Gauhar reiterates the need to recognise the subcontinent’s unique lifeline — a shared cultural heritage which crosses all borders.

With a dark shadow cast over bilateral ties following the Mumbai attack, and heightened by the high-decibel war on nerves unleashed on both sides, the stage had been set without their asking. But not only did acclaimed theatre director and actor Madeeha Gauhar’s Lahore-based group Ajoka, which turns 25 this year, perform thrice in India in the past month. The overwhelming response of audiences from Delhi to Kerala reaffirmed the feisty 52-year-old’s faith in people-to-people contact, sustained by the “legacy of the sub-continent’s shared cultural heritage that lives on in their hearts.”

Known for plays that have questioned Pakistan’s ‘military-mullah nexus’, Ajoka performed Hotel Mohenjodaro on January 16 at the National School of Drama’s festival in Delhi. The play is an adaptation of a prescient 1960s short story that predicted Pakistan’s troubled trajectory 30 years hence. Continue reading

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Ajoka Theatre and the Caucasian Chalk Circle

Raza Rumi

Who is entitled to keep the child – one who is a better, nurturing mother, or the one who may be the natural mother but could not care for the child? The larger question then haunts the audience: who is entitled to ownership – the one who has the deed or the one who tills the land?

Ajoka Theatre has revived a production that was first staged twenty three years ago. A deft adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s The Caucasian Chalk Circle, its vernacular version, Chaak Chakkar, is a timeless comment on the viciousness of Pakistan’s exploitative culture of power politics. Perhaps the duo, Shahid Nadeem the playwright, and Madeeha Gauhar the director, would have tried to capture bits of social reality in the mid 1980s when General Zia was still the Lord Master of Pakistan. Why did Ajoka choose to stage this after a gap of two decades? Continue reading

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Follow Hollow – a short play

FOLLOW HOLLOW

Characters in the play:

Hollow

Cribage

Filmy

Fulmee

Bearded Fuelus

Shaven Fuelus

One bunk bed lies along right wall, one along the left one. The former is slightly higher than the latter. One closet lies next to the right bed, one next to the left one. The latter is slightly higher than the former. One small dressing table lies next to the left closet, a small looking glass and refrigerator next to the right one. The center of the stage is bare. Cribage is sleeping peacefully on the left bunk. Hollow is sleeping restlessly on the right one, shifting about uneasily, as one having a bad dream. He stirs, tosses, turns, and finally falls, screaming. Lands with a thud. Continue reading

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