Tag Archives: Washington

…On the Birth of Balochistan Liberation Army

The Stunning Investigative Story on the Birth of Balochistan Liberation Army

By Tariq Saeedi in Ashgabat, Sergi Pyatakov in Moscow, Ali Nasimzadeh in Zahidan, Qasim Jan in Kandahar and SM Kasi in Quetta
MARCH 1: Deception and treachery. Live and let die. The ultimate zero sum game. Repetition of bloody history: Call it what you may, something is happening in the Pakistani province of Balochistan that defies comprehension on any conventional scale.
Four correspondents and dozens of associates who collectively logged more than 5000 kilometers during the past seven weeks in pursuit of a single question – What is happening in Balochistan? – have only been able to uncover small parts of the entire picture.
However, if the parts have any proportional resemblance to the whole, it is a frightening and mind-boggling picture. Every story must start somewhere. This story should conveniently have started on the night of 7 January 2005 when gas installations at Sui were rocketed and much of Pakistan came to almost grinding halt for about a week. Or, we should have taken the night of 2 January 2005 as the starting point when an unfortunate female doctor was reportedly gang-raped in Sui. However, the appropriate point to peg this story is January 2002 and we shall return to it in a minute.
Actually, the elements for the start of insurgency in Balochistan had been put in place already and the planners were waiting for a convenient catalyst to set things in motion. The gang-rape of 2 Jan, around which this sticky situation has been built, was just the missing ingredient the planners needed.
Two former KGB officers explained that the whole phenomenon has been assembled on skilful manipulation of circumstances. We shall keep returning to their comments throughout this report. Continue reading

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Filed under baluchistan, Islamabad, Pakistan, Pakistan-India Peace Process, quetta, Religion, Taliban, Terrorism, violence, war, Zardari

Pakistan is in pieces

[There is plenty here to stimulate a robust debate; Not that surprising, considering who the author is. PTH does not necessarily agree with the views expressed in this article.]

Belfast Telegraph, Tuesday, 6 April 2010             By Robert Fisk

I tried, in Pakistan, to define the sorrow which so constantly afflicts this country. The massive loss of life, the poverty, the corruption, the internal and external threats to its survival, the existentialism of Islam and the power of the army; perhaps Pakistan’s story can only be told in a novel. It requires, I suspect, a Tolstoy or a Dostoyevsky.

Pakistan ambushes you. The midday heat is also beginning to ambush all who live in Peshawar, the capital of the North West Frontier Province. Canyons of fumes grey out the vast ramparts of the Bala Hisar fort.

“Headquarters Frontier Force” is written on the ancient gateway. I notice the old British cannon on the heights – and the spanking new anti-aircraft gun beside it, barrels deflected to point at us, at all who enter this vast metropolis of pain. There are troops at every intersection, bullets draped in belts over their shoulders, machine guns on tripods erected behind piles of sandbags, the sights of AK-47s brushing impersonally across rickshaws, and rubbish trucks and buses with men clinging to the sides. There are beards that reach to the waist. The soldiers have beards, too, sometimes just as long.

I am sitting in a modest downstairs apartment in the old British cantonment. A young Peshawar journalist sits beside me, talking in a subdued but angry way, as if someone is listening to us, about the pilotless American aircraft which now slaughter by the score – or the four score – along the Afghanistan border. “I was in Damadola when the drones came. They killed more than 80 teenagers – all students – and, yes they were learning the Koran, and the madrasah, the Islamic school, was run by a Taliban commander. But 80! Many of them came from Bajaur, which would be attacked later. Their parents came afterwards, all their mothers were there, but the bodies were in pieces. There were so many children, some as young as 12. We didn’t know how to fit them together.” Continue reading

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Filed under Army, Colonialism, Democracy, History, Identity, India, Judiciary, Pakistan, Partition

Hussain Haqqani is a Patriot!

Crossposted from New Pakistan

Recent rumours that Pakistan’s Ambassador to the US Hussain Haqqani is being replaced are harming Pakistan’s interests. At a time when Pakistan is literally under attack by enemies both foreign and domestic, responsible journalists and political figures from all parties should unite to support the best interests of the nation and defend those, like Mr. Haqqani, who have devoted their lives to supporting a strong, free, independent Pakistan. Continue reading

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Justice In A Way: Obama and Gitmo

Comment by HP

Posted in response to Glen Greenwald’s article on Salon. The article is about the positions the Obama admin has been maintaining over the Gitmo detainees.
http://www.salon.com/opinion/greenwald/2009/07/08/obama/index.html Continue reading

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Obama and Jamaat Islami Youth Wing

Bradistan Calling

Note: The views expressed are author’s,PTH does not necessarily agree with all the views expressed.Some names have intentionally been omitted to protect privacy.

It was a long afternoon,with cricket T20 in the background, and the location was a Lebanese restaurant in St.  John’s wood, in the shadow of Lords cricket ground in central London and we were enjoying a long outdoor meal.

My guest was a childhood friend (alumni of  “Physics under Hoodbhoy”  and Islami Jamiat Talba), now an analyst with an American Bible-Belt Neo-Con Think-Tank, visiting London for a seminar on “Preventing Islamist Extremism” in the disenfranchised Muslim youth of U.K. He also ran a blog called “Friends of Pakistan” before the name was  artfully stolen by President Zardari’s team (Allegedly by Ambassador Haqqani, who is rumoured to ghost-write Zardari articles in NYT, WP and WSJ). Continue reading

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Filed under Activism, Afghanistan, Al Qaeda, Citizens, cricket, culture, Democracy, Economy, Education, Elections, Europe, FATA, History, human rights, Identity, India, Iran, Islam, Islamabad, Jinnah, journalism, Karachi, Kashmir, Left, Media, minorities, movements, Multinational Corporations, North-West Frontier Province, Northern Areas, Pakistan, Palestine-israel, Partition, Politics, poverty, Religion, south asia, Sufism, Taliban, Urdu, USA, war, Women, youth

Hamid Mir, Musharraf and the Taliban

By Yasser Latif Hamdani

It is people like Hamid Mir who are the problem with Pakistan. Today on his silly little show which has somehow managed to capture the imagination of the illiterate and ignorant conspiracy mongers,  he declared that while bombs are going off in the Indian elections and Maoists are on a rampage,   we are over-sensitive about Taliban.     He said Indians were unfazed by terrorism there and so should we.  On the same show we had Haji Adeel of the ANP who, while defending his party’s decision to sign the Nizam-e-Adl, broke into song and dance about the valiant struggle  to drive the British out in by Khudai Khidmatgar.  All this while both NWFP and Pakistan are at war.  Continue reading

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“What’s the Problem With Pakistan?”

The captioned discussion at FOREIGN AFFAIRS is informative as much about the “Sumit Gangulys” and the “Ashley Tellis-es” (don’t be fooled – this Ashley is actually a balding middle-aged Indian “research scholar”)  as it is about Pakistan.  I find the penchant of the arm-chair warriors for waging great wars of the late 21st century in the battle fields of their own head most endearing.   Stephen Cohen is class apart and there are some other good contributions that make this worth a read. -YLH Continue reading

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