Tag Archives: team

Match fixing: shameful and unacceptable

The News of the World exposes cricket match-fixing scandal

Raza Rumi

The match-fixing allegations are not new for Pakistani cricketers. In the past, such allegations have been proved within the country. The recent scandal with circumstantial evidence broke out by a British tabloid is simply mind-boggling and shameful. We hope that a fair inquiry will remove the mist from the narrative presented by the media. But a thorough inquiry must take place and all the recommendations should be implemented.

Even if there is a grain of truth in the allegations against 7 members of the the team including Mohammad Amir whose bowling was ironically praised in the ongoing test match, it is a matter of serious concern and brings shame to all Pakistanis.

That such an incident happens at the world stage when Pakistan is struggling to recover from a major natural disaster and seeking international assistance has ramifications for the country and its people.

What is wrong with us? Is it that bad? The absence of rule of law and flouting of ethical standards in every sphere seems to be our fate?

Perhaps, another conspiracy – as I just heard a few people on the television. No. We must admit that we are sliding down and we need to face our grim realities and do something about it.

Continue reading

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Cricket: Is anyone in Pakistan fed up?

I received this email from a reader in Australia. Happy to note that we are allowed to post it. Readers are invited to comment and offer their views (Raza Rumi).

Dear Raza

I’m a lover of cricket in all its forms. I played it, my son still plays it as do two of my grandchildren. I like to see tough contests, and unlike many other Australians I don’t mind if we lose if the opposition is clearly better (OK, may not quite so with England).

I was strongly looking forward to the current tour by Pakistan, but I’m almost breathless at the way the teams shoots itself in the foot, the toe, the mouth and whatever else they can find. I remember the Pakistani greats – Imran, Javed, Wasim, Waqar and so on, and they must feel really embarrassed by this tour.

Yousuf is fine batsman, but he’s no captain at this level. Trying to beat Australia in Australia with defensive tactics almost beggars belief. Political figures should step out of team matters and leave appointments to those who know them best.

Is anyone in Pakistan fed up? How do you feel about this matter?

Feel free to post my views on the Pak Tea House site because I’d like to see what response it gets

Cheers

Michael Whitting – Aussie Tragic



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Shoaib Akhtar’s genital warts keep him off T20 Team Pakistan

hoaib Akhtar’s genital warts keep him off T20 Team Pakistan
As injuries go, this one has to take the cake. And as for revelations and official press releases go, this one could be a sure nomination for the Oscar award for the best ‘visual’ effects, if not win it hands down!
In a statement graphic enough to necessitate a ‘Parental Guidance’ certificate, the Pakistan Cricket Board revealed, “The medical board has reported that Shoaib Akhtar was suffering from genital viral warts and the wound needs further care and treatment for a minimum 10 days for the purpose of healing and to achieve skin cover.”
For the uninitiated, I tried to dig it up in a medical dictionary, and it said, genital warts are a type of sexually transmitted disease (STD), also called a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Hmm, so just why the Pakistani cricket board came up with this explanation, when it would have sufficed to call it anything but what was revealed is beyond me. Unless of course, they wanted to embarrass him as a means of punishment to its perennially erring cricketer!
Akhtar has been one of Pakistan’s most controversial cricketers in their history. His offences range from the ever-so-common ball-chucking to doping, using abusive language in the ‘gentleman’s game’, smacking team-mates and calling the PCB chief by names!
Amidst all of this, Akhtar has had the time to send many a stump cart-wheeling, capture more than 400 wickets in all forms of international cricket, and bowl at speeds that are reminiscent to once found on a formula-one race track.
So while the Pakistani board has already announced that he will not be able to be featured in the ICC World T20 tournament, it would be interesting to know whether any action would be moved against the quick bowler for…er…having sex?

As injuries go, this one has to take the cake. And as for revelations and official press releases go, this one could be a sure nomination for the Oscar award for the best ‘visual’ effects, if not win it hands down!

In a statement graphic enough to necessitate a ‘Parental Guidance’ certificate, the Pakistan Cricket Board revealed, “The medical board has reported that Shoaib Akhtar was suffering from genital viral warts and the wound needs further care and treatment for a minimum 10 days for the purpose of healing and to achieve skin cover.”

For the uninitiated, I tried to dig it up in a medical dictionary, and it said, genital warts are a type of sexually transmitted disease (STD), also called a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Continue reading

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Pak Tea House is noted far and wide

Raza Rumi

Pak Tea House, to our great delight is serving its purpose as a platform for dialogue, debate and discussion.  Today’s post on the tragic acts of violence in Lahore was noted by many including the BBC. The most interesting coverage was made by the NYT blogs. Some of the comment-squabbles are instructive. Continue reading

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Pakistan: from bleak to bleaker?

Adnann, a regular visitor to Pak Tea House has contributed this post on the current situation. Today was a sad day and indeed has made us all worried – the enormity of the challenge posed by terrorism, the political squabbles and the powerlessness of the citizenry..(Raza Rumi – ed)

Pakistan escaped one of the biggest embarrassments when gunmen failed to kill the whole Sri Lankan cricket squad in a daring broad daylight operation.
Eight of the brave policemen laid their lives in saving the guests. If it were not for their actions, we may have stared at a screaming headline like “Sri-Lankan cricket team slaughtered”, or “Terrorists wipe out the visiting cricket team; darkest day in sports history”.
The whole operation seemed to be carefully planned. The use of rocket launchers and grenades suggest that this was not simply a scare tactic; the primary objective was a mass slaughter, and send a special message to rest of the world: “Pakistan is failing, it is unstable and highly dangerous for your health. Stay away”.
And likely, we will see more of these attacks in coming months. As the country remains politically paralyzed due to its innate ability to formant political crisis, the “terrorists” seem to be acting towards removing any signs of peace and social stability in Pakistan. Continue reading

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Shoaib Akhtar – a fallen hero

by Raza Rumi

I am not concerned with the technicalities of Shoaib Akhtar’s sentence, which have been the subject of much debate across Pakistan and indeed wherever cricket is played and followed. There have been some avoidable outbursts by both Akhtar and his disciplinarians. Akhtar has a chequered past in the conventional sense; and perhaps his tragic flaw is the cavalier attitude that is now a hallmark of his persona. But he is a star whose talent has done cricket, Pakistan, and Pakistanis proud. The quantum of punishment given to him has therefore been viewed as some sort of betrayal, and many have termed it unfair. But this is now a sub judice matter and so cannot be commented upon any further.

However, what lies underneath the narrative of Shoaib Akhtar’s plight relates to the sociological and attitudinal trends that have now engulfed Pakistan, like a poisonous creeper that consumes even the best kept plants in a garden.

Shoaib Akhtar is self-made, rising from humble origins into the global limelight. Born at Morgah, a small town near Rawalpindi, on August 13 1975, he is the youngest of four sons (he also has a younger sister) of an oil refinery worker. Far from following in his father’s footsteps, however, Akhtar began to show cricketing talent while still at school. It was at Asghar Mall College, during his twenties, that his extraordinary skill at the game was recognised; he played at increasingly high levels (including a spell for the English team Worcestershire), culminating in his selection for the national team in 1997. He then shot to international fame during the 1999 World Cup. Stunning spectators with his bowling ability, he went on to set the world record for bowling speed at 100.2 mph, where it still stands.

Nicknamed “The Rawalpindi Express,” Akhtar’s performance in the 1999 World Cup meant that he suddenly became a household name in Pakistan. The immense run-up, the hurtling legs, the characteristic flop of the hair: every young man on the Pakistani streets wanted to be Shoaib Akhtar. It is clear, however, that he belongs to no family or cartel of cricketers. Through this transition to stardom, Akhtar’s attitude reflected his independence and self-reliance, his use only of his own abilities, strengths and skills. Until now, he has defied the sport’s entrenched culture of patronage, and therefore has neither sought, nor benefited from, it. Hence his troubled relations with the authorities, and his reluctance to follow the ingrained feudal culture of obedience, have found resonance with a changing Pakistan. Continue reading

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