Tag Archives: Quaid-e-Azam

Was Jinnah A Democrat?

A continuation from “Was Jinnah secular?” and “Did Jinnah want Pakistan?”.

By Yasser Latif Hamdani

There are many people who criticize Jinnah – quite incorrectly in my opinion- of having laid the foundations for subsequent periods of authoritarian military rule. They allege that Jinnah’s decision to become the Governor General was the first blow to parliamentary democracy in Pakistan. Unable to distinguish the argument of constitutional purists pleading the ceremonial and executive roles of president and prime minister i.e. head of state and head of government from that of democratic argument about the sovereignty of parliament, these authors etc make the fatal error of not making an effort in understanding both the constitution in place and the environment under which Jinnah exercised his constitutional authority. By confusing the two, they make a mockery not just of the latter issue, but history itself. In the process they end up abusing the one person in Pakistan’s history who can truly be called a liberal democrat in every sense of the word. Continue reading

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Jinnah Considered Ahmadis Muslims

By YLH

As our anchors and TV channels commit national and logical suicide by referring to Ahmadi Mosques  as “marakaz” and “Ibadgahs”,  we must remind ourselves of the views of Quaid-e-Azam Mahomed Ali Jinnah who relied heavily on the Jamaat Ahmadiyya and its brilliant son Ch. Zafrulla Khan (whose younger brother was killed yesterday).   Jinnah not only considered Ahmadis Muslims, but relied on them to provide the manpower and skilled intellectual force in his efforts on behalf of the Muslims of India.  As a secular liberal Jinnah could not imagine how someone who considered himself Muslim could be called something else.

He said:

“I have been asked a disturbing question, as to who among the Muslims can be a member of the Muslim Conference. It has been asked with particular reference to the Qadianis. My reply is that, as far as the constitution of the All-India Muslim League is concerned, it stipulates that any Muslim, without distinction of creed or sect, can become a member, provided he accepts the views, policy and programme of the Muslim League, signs the form of membership and pays the subscription. I appeal to the Muslims of Jammu and Kashmir not to raise sectarian questions, but instead to unite on one platform under one banner. In this lies the welfare of the Muslims. In this way, not only can Muslims make political and social progress effectively, but so can other communities, and so also can the state of Kashmir as a whole.”

“Mr. M. A. Sabir tried as hard as he could to persuade the Quaid-i-Azam to declare Qadianis as being out of the fold of Islam. But the Quaid-i-Azam stuck resolutely to his principle and kept on replying: `What right have I to declare a person non-Muslim, when he claims to be a Muslim’.

(23rd May, 1944,  Srinagar)

 THE PARLIAMENT MUST REPEAL THE SECOND AMENDMENT NOW!  THE PARLIAMENT MUST STOP MAKING US THE LAUGHING STOCK OF THE WORLD FOR THE SAKE OF FEW CROOKS, CRANKS AND MADMEN WHO HAVE NEVER LIFTED A FINGER FOR PAKISTAN’S PROGRESS.  THE PARLIAMENT MUST STOP PERSECUTING PAKISTAN’S LOYAL SONS AND DAUGHTERS.

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Wake Up Call For Civil Society

By Brigadier (ret) Simon Samson Sharaf

Pakistan’s political establishment is back to its old ways of self preservation, aggrandisement and nepotism.  What makes the present malaise different from the 80s and 90s is that all major political parties are in power with stakes in the system. The architects of the elections in 2008 had drawn a crude power sharing formula that supports back scratching and keeps them in denial. Continue reading

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Mullah Ka Tasawar-e-Pakistan

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Courtesy Aaj Kal

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The Future Belongs To Jinnah

By Yasser Latif Hamdani

Jaswant Singh’s 670-page book on Pakistan’s founding father, Mohammad Ali Jinnah, has reignited the debate on Partition. From an academic point of view, however, he doesn’t seem to have said anything out of the ordinary. Much of this was first stated by Maulana Azad in his “India Wins Freedom”. In the intervening years between Azad and Jaswant Singh, several perceptive historians and authors, many from India, also presented a similar view of history, chief amongst them H M Seervai with his classic “Partition of India: Legend and Reality”. However, there is a new angle in Singh’s biography that is as much an indication of where things are moving in India as much as it is a historical context. Continue reading

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Filed under History, India, Jinnah, Jinnah's Pakistan, Pakistan, Partition

Post Colonial Pakistan And The Distortion Of History

By Yasser Latif Hamdani
An impartial history of the Pakistan Movement and the rise of the Muslim Nationalism in South Asia shows that the main engine behind it – the Muslim Bourgeoisie – was entirely drawn from the modernist educational tradition of Aligarh and other Muslim educational institutions founded and run by pro-west Muslim reformers like Sindh Medressah (which was a school modelled after British tradition, name notwithstanding), Anjuman-e-Himayat-e-Islam schools and colleges as well entirely secular institutions like the Government College, Punjab University and Peshawar University. In comparison the religious and scholarly class – i.e. Ulema- largely stood either aloof or in opposition to the the Pakistan Movement. Darul Uloom Deoband, the most important Islamic seminary in all of India, was as much an arsenal of pro-Congress Muslim Ulema after the Khilafat Movement as Aligarh was that of Muslim Nationalism. As the independence movement progressed, the pro-Western Aligarh Muslim University came to be associated more with Muslim minority’s cause and was denounced as “reactionary” by Congress as a whole. Pro-Congress Muslims created their own parallel Jamia Milli in Aligarh which was alter shifted to Delhi. Today it is the premiere Muslim institution in India, whereas Aligarh has been decaying. Continue reading

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Rebuttal to a Mullah of Another Kind

By Yasser Latif Hamdani

I am not a Marxist of any kind. Far from it. However I have the greatest respect for Marx and his singular contribution to humanity. I also respect Lenin and the architects of the Bolshevik Revolution. Continue reading

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