Tag Archives: Mandela

AND THEN THEY CAME FOR ME: AN ENCOUNTER WITH EVA SCHLOSS AND NIC CAREEM

Frank  Huzur has sent this interesting piece from London where he is busy writing a biography of a famous Pakistani

“… in spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can’t build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery, and death. I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness, I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too, I can feel the sufferings of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquillity will return again.” – Anne Frank

In a grey dapper suit slinking down his robust fifty years old shoulder, denim jeans and a black ray ban slunk over his slender nose, Nic Careem comes across as a blithe spirit, wide in strides and smiles, which occasionally drift into roaring guffaws. His deep, timber voice in London cockney accent is a throwback to ginger streets of Beatles. In his teens days he crooned Beatles’ rhymes and proudly proclaims Paul MaCartney as his bosom pal. So much so when Paul punched in his face over his quip over Heather Mills in an evening bash in London, Nic treated the Beatle blow as undeserving of reaction, as Mike Patel, British Asian tiger businessman would swear by the intense moment of hilarious tip-off. He is a trapeze artiste in swapping causes, noble and aesthetic, by any standards. Among his illustrious list of friends, he rattles out names of all spectrum on the rainbow bow from Barrack Hussain Obama, Nelson Mandela, Tony Blair, Bill Clinton, Kofi Annan, David Cameron to legendary holocaust survivor and step-sister of Anne Frank, Eva Schloss. Continue reading

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Islam, violence, World

Hitchens Says Palestinians Need A Mandela Not A Gandhi

New Statesman

My column in last week’s magazine focused on the need for a Palestinian (and an Israel) Gandhi figure, to renounce terror on both sides and end the destructive “cycle of violence” and mutual fear and distrust:

“…neither side has ever come even close to producing viable leaders committed to non-violence and able to articulate an authentically Gandhian vision for ending the conflict. On the Palestinian side, Yasser Arafat’s approach can be summed up in his warning about having an olive branch in one hand but a gun in the other. On the Israeli side, Yitzhak Rabin, the joint architect of the Oslo Accords, will always be remembered by the Palestinians as the man who also ordered Israeli troops to “break the bones” of protesters during the first intifada.Those considered to be peacemakers fall hopelessly short of being a latter-day Gandhi or a Middle Eastern Martin Luther King. Waiting for such figures to emerge, even in the Holy Land, could be like waiting for Godot.”

Now Christopher Hitchens has emailed me to say that I may be focusing on the wrong role model – it is a Nelson Mandela that the Palestinians need, not a Mohandas Gandhi. He writes:

“Edward Said used to talk and write about the need for a Palestinian Mandela. I think that might lead you – and such Israelis and Jews as will listen – in a better direction than Gandhi. But the ANC wasn’t pacifist in name or in fact, despite the Mahatma’s early input.” Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under Palestine-israel