Tag Archives: Hafeez Pirzada

Pakistan: Clear and present danger

Raza Rumi

If the parliament and judiciary want to continue exercising their newfound powers, they have no option but to act strictly within the framework of the Pakistani Constitution

Pakistan is a surreal country. Only here we have long, protracted struggles for democracy and only here we are almost always ready to scuttle democracy. Perhaps Iskander Mirza was not all too wrong while making the assessment that democracy does not suit the genius of our people. An added qualification is that it does not suit the genius of the elites, in particular the unelected institutions of the state.

There is now a clear and present danger that the judicial review of the 18th Amendment will lead to a potential clash of the key organs of the state: the legislature and the judiciary. Pundits have also predicted that if such a situation arises, then a logjam will benefit the third force — Pakistan’s well organized formal institution, which is readily available to undertake crisis management. Perhaps such fears are slightly exaggerated and misplaced. But the reality is that Pakistani history teaches us some interesting though unsavoury lessons.

Curse of history

The Constitution of 1956 was drafted, almost after a decade of the new country’s formation, as the elites were not interested in changing the colonial structure of the state and its institutions. After much negotiation and a bit of arm-twisting, parity between the Eastern and the Western wings was achieved to finalise the basic law. However, the 1956 Constitution could not be enforced let alone implemented, as new elections were a risk for the national security establishment, which took charge of the country in 1958. The second moment arrived in 1970, when a political consensus arrived through election with divisive results, was once again scuttled by the unelected institutions and the West Pakistani elites. The results were tragic. 1977 was a third moment when the Bhutto administration and PNA movement agreed on a workable package for the future course of politics in the country. Even before this accord could reach the public domain, the Islamo-fascist General took the reins of power and thwarted the political consensus. There is a clear lesson here: a political consensus — wide-ranging, legitimate and inclusive — is a threat to the post-colonial state and the inherent contradictions of the Pakistani polity come into play the moment such compacts are arrived at. Continue reading

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Filed under Constitution, human rights, Judiciary, Justice, Law, lawyers movement, Media, minorities, Pakistan, Politics, public policy, Rights, secular Pakistan, Society, state

Attention Madam Speaker Of The National Assembly Of Pakistan

I received this email and an appended letter to the honorable Speaker of the National Assembly of Pakistan,  Dr. Fahmida Mirza.   This is not being posted here for sectarian debate or any other kind of debate but for right of information- any attempts at introducing a theological debate on the issue shall be subject to automatic deletion.   Surely the geniuses who believe that the second amendment to the constitution was justified should not have any problem bringing to light the fascinating debate on the issue.   And it is appropriate that the PPP government should be in power as it was the party in power then as well. -YLH  

Dear Mr. Hamdani sahib, Hello Sir!

 My name is Bashir Khan and I am a recent graduate of the University of New Brunswick Faculty of Law which is located on the east coast of Canada (bordering Maine). At the moment I am working for a firm specialising in human rights and refugee law. I am a Pakistani-Canadian and have been living in Canada from the age of 11.  I am myself an Ahmadi Muslim. I wanted to mention this so that I could express to you that I am a strong believer in Mr. Jinnah’s secular Pakistan where all citizens regardless of cast, creed and religion are equal citizens of the state. Continue reading

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Filed under Jinnah's Pakistan, Liberal Democratic Pakistan, liberal Pakistan, minorities, Parliament, People's Pakistan, secular Pakistan