The Meltdown Of Logic

By D Asghar

It is rather disheartening to see the lack of objective analysis when it comes to the general population of Pakistan. Mostly people tend to think along the lines of religion or language and tend to hold their strong position irrespective of what facts are presented to them. Any person engaging in a meaningful dialogue is shunned by the usual and often debated conspiracy rhetoric.

Let’s take the event of 09/11 for an example. On the eve of 09/11, when I spoke with my Mother in Karachi, she was convinced by the Pakistani media that there was not a single Jew, who was murdered. All the Jews were informed a day in advance, not to show up to work, that ill fated Tuesday. When I informed her about the facts, it was hard for her to accept. I had a few discussions with my relatives, who were adamant about that. They were utterly convinced that it was an “inside job”, and the whole incident was a pathetic attempt by “Evil America” to malign the Muslims and to “conquer their lands.”

I have expressed my views regarding Bush era’s follies of ill planned and prepared invasions of both Afghanistan and Iraq. Those were two very costly strategic mistakes. On the other hand, if measured, timely and effective strikes were done to dismantle the over zealous terror network, things perhaps would have been different.

The argument of 09/11 being an “inside job”, defies any logical intelligence. The Bush Administration in their cocky attitude needed no precursor to launch their ill conceived invasions. Yes the event of 09/11, provided the Bush Administration to sell a fairly weak argument to the nation to invade Iraq. The poor results of that poor plan based on a poor argument are in front of the entire world.

But our Muslim media had a field day, painting the picture of the hijackers as zionist agents. When Barbara Walters of either ABC or CBS did a special report and traveled to Saudi Arabia and Egypt to meet the families of those hijackers, which of course were not “paid actors”, no credible rebuttal came from the Muslim world. Lately, Ahmedinijad of Iran, eluded to the same thing at UN General Assembly that the entire event was concocted. No one ever asked Ahmedinijad, would he allow an American to present a dissenting opinion to the people of Iran on the National TV of Iran.

There were 3 Americans held by Iran recently and charge of spying was leveled against them. A female out of the 3 was released on humanitarian grounds, after the $500,000 bail. Iran’s hypocritical stance is quite evident to the rest of the world. How the Iranian regime kills dissent in Iran by violence is common knowledge. Yet the general Muslim world is fine with that, because after all Iranians are “Muslims.”

We have another example of the infamous Dr Aafia Siddiqui. Her conviction has sparked a lot of protest in Pakistan. The religious zealots who are out burning flags and effigees and causing destruction to vent their anger never ask the following questions:

A) According to her sister (please see story www.thenews.com.pk dated Sept 24, 2010), Dr. Siddiuqui was sold to Americans by then President Musharraf. Why there was no case filed by the family, the civil society and the politicians against the President? Why was no suo moto notice not taken against her absence by the apex court?

B) Why did the defendant take the stand in a supposedly “hostile court” in her personal defense and no proper legal representation was sought?

C) The Interior Minister Malik kept on harping after her conviction that, she will be brought back to Pakistan at any cost. What prevented him to do what he said? The religious fanatics should have garnered a movement to hire a legal team to challenge the so called “circumstantial evidence” in the court of law, prior to the sentencing phase. Next the defendant’s rhetoric about the verdict coming directly from Israel was not a logical statement to begin with. What benefit did state of Israel get from her conviction?

D) The media in Pakistan paints a picture of “heavy handedness” and atrocity by the US Justice system. Yet in all these years, why the TV channels have not gained access to her to broadcast her side of the story. All the unknowns about the case should be brought to the fore to prove her “innocence.”

The concept of illogical notion that US and Israel are out to destabilize Pakistan is quite farcical. If US had the agenda to get rid of Pakistan, it should have not opened the war theaters around Pakistan. It would have taken the fierce measures from the skies to cause destruction. For those who cry on drones, yes I am not in support of their blind usage. But measured drone usage has proven to be very effective.

Similarly, if US had the intention of destroying Pakistan, the US would have turned a blind eye towards aid after the devastating earthquake and floods. After all the nature took its course in favor of the US evil agenda, yet US has always been a great ally of Pakistan in tough situations. When the aid is needed we have no qualms, but when it comes to implicating US in any domestic issue, we never waist any time.

As a Pakistani American, I do not agree with a lot of policies of the US around the globe and voice my dissent, but by the same token cannot subscribe to the widely held argument that US wants to eliminate Pakistan. When it comes to the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the Pakistani media in specific and the Muslim media in general paints an illogical picture of religion being the main issue. It is more of a territorial dispute as there are Palestinians who are Christians as well. Amazingly in all these years, the Muslim nations have failed to gather on any unified plan to resolve the long standing dispute. It is mostly for lip service and political mileage, whenever Palestinian issue is revisited. On the other hand, as biased as US is towards Israel, it is the US diplomacy that always brings the two nations of Israel and Palestinians towards some negotiations and resolutions.

It is high time that Muslim world in general and Pakistan in specific develop objective and logical thinking. We should step out of the mentality of victomhood. We should put our interest and national perception to the fore front and become informed  citizens of this world and the universe. The world needs to see the bright and positive side of our characters, intellect and the faith.

25 Comments

Filed under Pakistan

25 responses to “The Meltdown Of Logic

  1. Anwar

    What a beautiful collage of the gripes of Tashbih Sayyed, Amir Tahiri, Fouad Ajami and the Benador Associates…..

  2. Athar S.

    Dead On, Bro. Dead On!!!

    Keep up great work – keep bring light to dark corners. It will go a long way. Fantastic.

    You, NFP and likes are doing a great service showing many their true mirrors.

  3. Raza Raja

    Needless to say that I completely agree!!!!I think this was your best article so far

  4. Questor

    Reminds me of Nabiha Meher’s article, where she was teaching students to think logically and objectively.

    What are the societal pressures that cause a person to abandon thinking logically and objectively?

  5. Honorliving

    Why bother with the truth? And Pakistani media is not really not interested in finding the truth. It just doesn’t sell.

  6. Tilsim

    D Asghar

    Great article. Passionately written.

    Critical thinking is needed as a regular class room subject in it’s own right. Moderate Pakistanis should focus on developing the course content.

  7. T.S. Bokhari

    I wonder why the hyjakers of 9/11 were not considered as ‘Qadyanees’ as they certainly would have got their passports by not signing the paky half-namah of belief in ‘Khatme Nabuwwat’.

    Just imagine the weired thinking of the paky halfi muslims who are not prepared to consider any paky citizen a muslim unless and until he declares himself to be a believer in what they call ‘Khatm-e-Nabuwwat’ (The end of prophet-hood). Even the state calling itself ‘Islamic’ does not accept one as a muslim till he signs and submits a declaration prescribed by its officialdom deeming themselves to be demi-god.

    But what a height of absurdity of thinking is it that the same people who consider ascertainment of belief in ‘Khatm-e-Nabuwwat’ essential for a paky citizen to be considered a muslim, considered all those as muslims, prior to 1974, and still consider other muslims of the world, as muslims without signing a declaration of ‘Kh.N’, thus creating a new division of ‘Halfi’ and ‘Non-halfi’ muslims among the so called ‘Ummah’.

    Do you think these people can think logically when a poet has aptly said about them:

    “Yih tawwaaham ka kaarkhaana he
    Yaan who hi he jo ehtibaar kia”.

    Have a nice day!

  8. SCARE

    OMG wat a truthful analysis.

  9. Wow what a piece!
    I am gobsmacked at how beautifully the author has put such diverse issues from 9/11 to Palestine to Pakistan in one breath.
    Unfortunately when it comes to nationalism or (religiosity for that matter), I yet have to see a single country following logic and rationality. For example, foreign troops kept killing Iraqis even when it was admitted that Iraq did not have WMDs.
    Too political? OK lets talk something more fancy.
    When there is clear evidence that climate change is happening and next few decades are utterly decisive re our fate on this planet, the largest carbon polluter refuses to cut down emissions.
    Not your piece of cake? Ok lets take another example.
    When the capitalist economic logic says that markets will root out any inefficiencies in the system and that trade is always good, the US and EU continue to provide billions in subsidies to their farmers while the poor Brazilians and Indians try to keep up with the market and in the process, get “rooted out”.
    Moral of the story, my dear friend, is
    “Lets not talk logic” or you will have hard time coming to to grips with your own words.

  10. Shah Faisal. I agree with you. PTH is lucky to have a wide range of authors. Now DA is adding value to this space and we welcome him.
    Sent from my BlackBerry® Smartphone. Typos are regretted

  11. Ah I take your point Rumi sahib
    Your guests are my guests🙂

  12. ali hamdani

    there is definitely an important role of the media to be played at this time. Only if media can potray positivity and report the wrong doings as well but not 24/7. It will discourage the Taliban.

  13. moniems

    “It is high time that Muslim world in general and Pakistan in specific develop objective and logical thinking”.

    Well said sir!

    But how do we go about it? Should we not reflect that there has to be something peculiar to Muslims which makes them more prone to this affliction?

    In my humble view, it is our religion. Islam is the only religion which disallows dissent, and that too at the pain of death. The word “Kafir” is a patent of Islam. Any one who does not accept the dictates of Islam is a Kafir (non-believer). Qur’an enjoins upon its followers to put all Kafirs to the sword. No one wants to be a Kafir and no one wants to be put to the sword. There can thus be no dissent. The end result is that we lose the capacity to question, and get into the habit of accepting any thing we are told by someone in religious or other authority over us. Were not such an authority used to brain-wash Ajmal Kasab and nine others, and sent to Mumbai to bring shame upon all Muslims? If one wants to convert a human being into a monster, Muslims know the only way!

    That is why most people think, “All Muslims may not be terrorists. But all terrorists are Muslims”.

    Those who have rebelled against such religious dictates, like Ibn Warraq, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Salman Rushdi etc., have had Fatwas issued against them. There is a growing trend of highly educated Muslims renouncing their religion; of course quietly.

    The other thing peculiar to Muslims is they can think of nothing short of death when dealing with an opposing view. I am told there are 72 different kinds of Muslims in Pakistan, and no one is liked by all the other kinds. So they kill each other, because they are incapable of thinking. Is a suicide bomber capable of thinking?

    The habit of free inquiry and inquisitiveness has to be developed in our children from the very beginning. There is no other way. That is why I insist all religious education, either by parents or by schools, is postponed till after a child is mature enough to think for himself/herself.

  14. Tilsim

    @ moniems
    “Qur’an enjoins upon its followers to put all Kafirs to the sword. No one wants to be a Kafir and no one wants to be put to the sword. There can thus be no dissent. The end result is that we lose the capacity to question, and get into the habit of accepting any thing we are told by someone in religious or other authority over us. Were not such an authority used to brain-wash Ajmal Kasab and nine others, and sent to Mumbai to bring shame upon all Muslims? If one wants to convert a human being into a monster, Muslims know the only way!”

    Clearly you have bought and propogate the Islam is the root to all evil myth. It’s sad to see such sweeping generalisations about a civilisation and a culture of over a billion people. If you want to promote your own beliefs or a lack thereof, is it necessary to be a propagandist against another’s?

  15. Tilsim

    @ moniems

    Elsewhere you finished off a comment with: “may Allah bless Pakistan?”

    Can you please explain what you are trying to achieve here?

    I support a secular constitution for Pakistan, but we have nothing in common.

  16. Kaalket

    I guess Moniems is wondering if some one is brought up upon the thesis ,steady diet of “Submission” and not allowed to question the dogmatic schemes of life then its not fair to expect critical, reasoning from that fellow as the human mental faculty of logic,thinking or rational,skeptic enquiry is already supressed. Muslims living in Kuffar societies do develop this human faculty but as far as islamic societies are concerened this freedom of thinking development dont exist and there is no reason to believe that given the freedom and removal of this suffocation, this humane thinking attitude wont develiop and flourish in people of Pakistan , Iran, Saudia etc.

  17. Tilsim

    @ Kaalket

    There is plenty of debate and dissent in Islam. It’s there right now and right from the beginning. What is new is the Wahabi/Salafist/deobandi interpretation of going to some form of ‘pure’ monolithic, anti-historical dogmatic islam. This form of Islam has firmly planted it’s roots in Pakistan, the reasons for which have been talked elsewhere.

    It’s also quite astonishing to hear that humane thinking attitudes cannot or have not developed in muslim societies. There is so much evidence that negates this. I would agree that they are not much in evidence amongst the mainstream because of general ignorance, illiteracy, unethical attitudes and a suffocating and in my view, distorted orthodoxy. These problems lie with how ordinary muslims and their clerics approach Islam. As many people have debated previously on PTH, a nascent reformation is underway. As a muslim, I have deep interest in seeing this gaining strength.

    One of the founders of secular thought, Ibn Rushd was a card carrying Muslim and there have been plenty of Muslim rationalists and thinkers through the ages. The reformers are charting new paths but they also have rich antecedents.

    Submission to me means the suppression of the ego and one’s actions to a higher moral and ethical plain, not the suppression of free will or reason.

    I think the problem lies with Islamic literalism and orthodoxy and what passes for Islamic culture which is inherently conservative and statist. In contrast, Islam spread in it’s early days because it challenged the orthodoxy of the prevailing material, cultural, spiritual and religious norms at the time.

    The prophet’s own beloved uncle who was his protector was a non-believer right to the end according to the Sunni tradition. This is what the Quran has to say about compulsion in matters of belief:

    “There is no compulsion in religion — the right way is indeed clearly distinct from error.”— 2:256

    “If they accept Islam, then indeed they follow the right way; and if they turn back, your duty (O Prophet) is only to deliver the message.” — 3:20

    “And obey Allah and obey the Messenger; but if you turn away, the duty of Our Messenger is only to deliver the message clearly.” — 64:12; see also 5:92

    “Say (to people): Obey Allah and obey the Messenger. But if you turn away, he is responsible for the duty imposed on him, and you are responsible for the duty imposed on you. And if you obey him, you go aright. And the Messenger’s duty is only to deliver (the message) plainly.” — 24:54

    “O people, the truth has indeed come to you from your Lord; so whoever goes aright, goes aright only for the good of his own soul; and whoever errs, errs only to its detriment. And I am not a custodian over you.” — 10:108

    “Surely We have revealed to you (O Prophet) the Book with truth for people. So whoever follows the right way, it is for his own soul, and whoever errs, he errs only to its detriment. And you are not a custodian over them.” — 39:41

    “We have not appointed you (O Prophet) a keeper over them, and you are not placed in charge of them.” — 6:107

    “Your duty (O Prophet) is only the delivery of the message, and Ours (God’s) is to call (people) to account.” — 13:40

    I found moniem’s presentation of Islam as either deeply misinformed or perhaps motivated by spreading the views of his own movement.

  18. Questor

    There might be several factors contributing here, of which only one might be “don’t question religion”. How is society organized in Pakistan? Can a person truly survive on his/her own, or is the biradari essential? Then a second check on independent thinking would be “don’t go against the biradari”. Add to that mis-education or non-education, and so on.

  19. Questor

    Tilsim,

    If you think about it deeply, you see how almost irrelevant it is what the Holy Book(s) of any religion say; it is what people take it to mean and how they actually behave that matters.

    ““We have not appointed you (O Prophet) a keeper over them, and you are not placed in charge of them.” — 6:107” – why does this not sink into the consciousness of so many people in the public arena, who do behave as though they are the keepers of their brothers’ religious belief?

    It is like the US Constitution, Amendment 8, “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.” Till 2001, waterboarding was cruel and unusual punishment, and people were prosecuted for waterboarding. But G.W. Bush legitimized it, and now it is arguably permissible for the government to do it. At least, no one who did it will be prosecuted. John Yoo, as a member of government, who set this out is happily a professor of law at Berkeley, and they all say “he is protected by academic freedom” – which is a specious argument, because he was not an academic when he told the Bush administration that torture was OK.

    So what changed? The historical meaning of the words, the concepts did not change – the people changed, the meaning they chose to read into the 8th Amendment changed. What protection do we have against that when an entire people decide to do so? None at all. Logic, reason, tradition, precedent, previous interpretation – these count for naught.

    The good thing is that people can similarly switch from bad to good, also without changing the text. So the US declaration of independence which originally was taken to apply to “white adult male property owners” now extends to all races and genders of people regardless of their wealth. Again, this happened without an alteration of the text, it happened because over time, people read a new meaning into the text.

    That is why all this text-torturing theology is so pointless. It cannot really change behavior. Textual interpretation is simply used to justify whatever behavior the interpreter is comfortable with.

    So, e.g., if a person already has a moral sense, he does not really need Quranic teachings to know not to kill, say, Ahmedis; and if he does not have a moral sense, no amount of Quran will keep him from killing, say, Ahmedis – he will simply read his own desires into the text, and be doubly delighted that he has holy sanction for his massacres.

    What is the purpose of a holy book then? All I can say is that it may provide answers to questions that you cannot answer on your own. E.g., do you have an existence after death? It may also keep someone who is good, but weak, from wavering and straying to a wrong path. It provides a common context within which people can deal with each other, e.g., festivals, rituals, worship, etc. It provides a bridge across the generations and across history.

    Seeking more than that is the way to madness.

  20. moniems

    @Tilsim

    You make it obvious you did not like what I wrote.

    I was trying to address the following:

    “It is high time that Muslim world in general and Pakistan in specific develop objective and logical thinking”.

    I attempted, to the best of my intellect, to see the reason why we lack objective and logical thinking. It was by no means an attempt to denigrate Islam. What I said is not wrong after all. You will recall that on an earlier occasion I had submitted to you that I have no personal beliefs to propagate, and explained in detail my reasons. I request you not to accuse me of such motives.

    I wish you had told me why y0u disagree with my argument. I have put forward my arguments, and I expect every reader to pick holes into them. I shall be the first person to thank you if you prove me wrong.

    When I say, “May Allah bless Pakistan.” I mean nothing more or less than when I say, “Ram Bhaarat ka bhalaa karey”. Pardon me if you see sarcasm into it; that is not what I ever use. And, I am secular too.

    Let me assure you with all sincerity at my command that I am a well-wisher of Pakistan. My roots lie there!

  21. Tilsim

    @ Questor

    “That is why all this text-torturing theology is so pointless. It cannot really change behavior. Textual interpretation is simply used to justify whatever behavior the interpreter is comfortable with. ”

    I agree with you that words are just words, open to interpretation depending on one’s moral compass; it’s our deep thought and actions that count.

    For me, it’s the stance of the muslim world in general and their actions that I wish to see changed because I think there is a general crisis of personal and societal ethics, perceived loss of power and time bound literalism amongst muslims. However some specific charges were made against Islamic doctrine by moniems for which I felt it was best to present a specific response from the Quran . These charges were:

    “Islam is the only religion which disallows dissent, and that too at the pain of death.”

    “Any one who does not accept the dictates of Islam is a Kafir (non-believer). ”

    “Qur’an enjoins upon its followers to put all Kafirs to the sword. ”

    Kaalket talked about the concept of submission being a problem. I gave my perspective on this.

    There is much confusion (or different interpretations) around the nature of Islamic teachings amongst both muslims and non-muslims. I would prefer that some light is shone in the darkness. For example, in many muslims view a Kafir is better understood to be someone who rejects God and as such is an unbeliever in the general sense. The state of belief is not specific to Islamic teachings. In fact, Islam teaches that belief in the concept of a universal deity is not unique to muslims – no exclusivity. When it is talking about kufr (unbelief), it is talking about it as a personal position. As you might agree, belief and unbelief are two different states of mind and we can have different perspectives about the desirability of one stance over another. Nowhere is it mandated that an unbeliever should be killed. On the contrary, the Quran says:

    “Call people to the Way of your Rabb with wisdom and best advice, and reason with them, if you have to, in the most courteous manner: for your Rabb knows best who strays from His Way and He knows best who is rightly guided. (Sura Al-Nahl: Verse:125)”

    It is true that Kafir is used as a derogratory term by many muslims in their zeal and at times they have also killed but that is more a reflection of injustice and hubris (both against the teachings of the faith). Unjust attitudes and hubris is a common human failing, not unique to people of religion. It is because of the poor way the religion is taught and understood, the behaviour of muslims often fails to change.

    My purpose here is not to go on about Islam. For me, it’s a personal matter. However misunderstanding, misinformation or purposeful disinformation plays a big part in the current state of affairs. Opinions are hardening against muslims and Islam with great speed, due to activities of 1)muslims themselves 2) OBL, Islamists 3) evangelists from other religions and 4) ascendance of an aggressive form of atheism. At times it feels like ordinary muslims will be the new kafirs, subject to ridicule and put to the sword🙂.

  22. Tilsim

    @ Questor

    “There might be several factors contributing here, of which only one might be “don’t question religion”. How is society organized in Pakistan? Can a person truly survive on his/her own, or is the biradari essential? Then a second check on independent thinking would be “don’t go against the biradari”. Add to that mis-education or non-education, and so on.”

    Yes, all of these and more.

    1) Rote learning is a factor: disengage brain, suspend critical faculties and just parrot.

    2) An overly deferential attitude to authority, in particular elders and religious authority is another.

    3) A belief that one is superior through affixing the label of Islam to oneself rather than through one’s good and just actions and ethical stance.

    4) A lack of interest in knowledge, science, social sciences, the humanities, rational thought

    4) No understanding of the demands of critical thought and analysis.

    6) The intense struggles of daily life that leave little time or spirit for seeking higher purpose. Full delegation of religious thought and enquiry to the illiterate, power hungry, bigoted mullah.

  23. moniems

    @Tilsim

    These factors are relevent indeed, but applicable not only to Muslims but to all humanity. What we need to find out is:

    “Ham niraley kyoun hain?”

  24. Tariq Majeed

    Nice words, logical analysis isn’t enough to handle issues. A typical problem of foreign-born [dual nationality individuals] they adopt the new culture, start thinking in those terms, offer advice but not a single person is able to translate any “logical thinking” into solid actions. Devise the way and do it or support those who try to do it.
    In reality, whenever someone try to do anything, either they become, punjabi, balouchi, sindhi, pasthun or mohajir or muslims and eventually nothing happens!

    Just a simple logical analysis is not enough… particularly offshore. Devise strategies to implement those in real lives of pakistani’s if you are sincere. That’s where the problem remains!

  25. Bin Ismail

    @T.S. Bokhari (September 29, 2010 at 6:17 am)

    “…..I wonder why the hyjakers of 9/11 were not considered as ‘Qadyanees’ as they certainly would have got their passports by not signing the paky half-namah of belief in ‘Khatme Nabuwwat’…..”

    The way you’ve spelled “half-namah” could well be read as “1/2 nama”, which means ‘half the document’, which would actually be a correct narration because the said Declaration leads one to only half the truth. Well, what is the whole truth? The whole truth is that Ahmadis believe in every single jot of the Quran, including the verse on Khatamun Nabiyyeen. Ahmadis believe that Muhammad Rasoolullah was indeed Khatamun Nabiyyeen. Now, how do Ahmadis interpret the concept of Khatamun Nabiyyeen? Ahmadis understand the term Khatamun Nabiyyeen, not as ‘the chronologically last prophet’ but in the sense of ‘the unltimate prophet’, last in the sense that he occupies a spiritual height beyond which there is no attainable station. This is the whole truth. Ahmadis also believe the Holy Prophet to be chronologically last in the sense that he was the last Law-bearing Prophet.

    “……the paky halfi muslims who are not prepared to consider any paky citizen a muslim unless and until he declares himself to be a believer in what they call ‘Khatm-e-Nabuwwat’ (The end of prophet-hood)…..”

    Not that I disapprove of it, but personally, I prefer to use the term ‘State-certified Muslim’ instead of ‘halfi muslim’.

    @Tilsim (September 30, 2010 at 2:24 am)

    “…..This is what the Quran has to say about compulsion in matters of belief: “There is no compulsion in religion — the right way is indeed clearly distinct from error.”— 2:256…..”

    Absolutely. Islam is what the Quran says, not what the mullah says. As you’ve quoted, the Quran says: “There is no coercion in matters of religion.” (2:256 ). What does “no coercion” refer to? No coercion in matters of religion would mean:

    (a) no coercion for getting someone to enter the fold of Islam
    (b) no coercion for keeping someone within the fold of Islam
    (c) no coercion for making someone subscribe to a certain interpretation of Islam
    (d) no coercion for expelling someone from the fold of Islam

    In essence, what this verse teaches is that no form of coercion and compulsion is permissible in any matter that pertains to belief,faith and religion. This is exactly what commonsense, too, would dictate because man should logically be accountable only for those actions that are born out of his free will. No volition – no accountability. Coercion annuls free choice and is therefore not permissible in any matter of religion, according to the Quran.

    @Tariq Majeed (October 2, 2010 at 2:09 pm)

    “…..Devise strategies to implement…..”

    Pakistan needs a new constitution, a constitution that reflects the message and soul of Quaid-e Azam’s historical 11th August 1947 speech and fulfills his vision of a secular and forward-looking Pakistan and materializes his Last Will. Pakistan needs a constitution that can guarantee equality, justice and fairplay to all its citizens, to all the people for whom Pakistan is home.